Constitutional lawyers say a delay in the appointment of a substantive anti-corruption commission is an impediment in the fight against corruption in the country.

This follows the resignation of the commission last month.

The Zimbabwe Anti-Corruption Commission (ZACC) was established to effectively deal with rampant corruption affecting economic progress.

The resignation of the commission has created a vacuum rendering the secretariat inoperable.

Constitutional law expert Professor Lovemore Madhuku says the Parliamentary Standing Rules Committee is mandated by the constitution to call for the nomination of possible candidates before interviews and submission of names to the President.

Professor Madhuku, however, revealed the President has the powers to appoint a chair of the commission to ensure the ZACC secretariat functions while waiting for the process in the appointment of other commissioners.

Another constitutional lawyer Advocate Tazorora Musarurwa says the ZACC secretariat can only finalise on cases which were left out by the outgoing commission as they do not have the mandate to carry out any duties.

This will be the first time ZACC commission appointments will be in terms of the 2013 constitution.

The process involves the public and gives room for competition among candidates, a development which improves public confidence in the commission.

Section 255 of the constitution empowers ZACC to investigate and expose cases of corruption in the public and private sector, to combat corruption, misappropriation, abuse of power, promote financial discipline, honesty, transparent among other important functions.