Metallon Corporation has been urged to follow the requisite procedures in retrenching workers at its Mazowe gold fields.

Concern has been raised that the Labour Act was not followed by the mining concern in retrenching workers.

Speaking at an interface between Mazowe Mine management and 300 of the 500 retrenched employees at Jumbo Mine Stadium, Mazowe South legislator Advocate Fortune Chasi said management should follow the proper legal channel in downsizing its workforce.

“The law doesn’t allow for retrenchments without proper notice. When you retrench there are procedures under our labour law that you follow. You sit in the works council. The package itself has to be sent to the Ministry of Labour. There is a structure that evaluates your decision,” said Advocate Chasi.

The workers accused management of taking them for a ride and failing to listen to their demands.

“The company is negotiating in bad faith. They have sent misleading reports to what is actually happening on the ground to cover up,” said Mr Peter Mangisa, a workers’ representative.

The mine management cited operational costs and deficits as hampering progress.

“Our production has been quite low, our costs are quite high; the losses we have been making are quite huge. Several turnaround strategies have been applied,” said Allan Mushayavanhu, Acting Mine Manager Mazowe Mine.

Metallon Corporation owns Mazowe Mine, Shamva Mine, Redwing Mine and How Mine which are reported to be in the same predicament.

Last year, Metallon produced about 94 212 ounces of gold and its overall output ranges close to 25 percent of the total production of Zimbabwe.

500 workers were saved with notices of termination of employment on Saturday with the exit package still to be discussed.

Workers salary arrears are reported to date back to 2014 and this year alone some have not been paid since January.

The majority of the affected employees worked in the production line and milling plant.

Meanwhile, Metallon is also under investigation for alleged externalisation of around US$30 million.